What have we learned?

“The responsibility for Holocaust education is ours. As the number of living witnesses dwindles, we have a sacred task: children today will be the grandparents and great-grandparents of the future. We want them to continue telling this important story to ensure that nothing similar will ever happen again.” – In the 70 years since the trauma of Auschwitz, what have we learned?

And still, it doesn’t seem we are doing a great job. Hate and terror is still spreading around and it just seems some human beings don’t know how to behave. But we don’t have to forget what happened to our grandparents: life cannot be abused like this.
Many years ago, when I was studying in Germany, my parents came to visit and we decided to go to Buchenwald a concentration camp near Weimar.

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It wasn’t my first time in a concentration camp, we have one in Trieste my hometown in Italy. The place is called Risiera di San Sabba and it was used like a transit camp even if they killed plenty of people over there as well. The crematorium was destroyed just in time to hide the evidences.
It doesn’t matter how may times you have been in these places, you can always tell something awful happened there. You can smell it in the air, you can feel it in your bones.
Buchenwald was worse than the one in Italy, there were more proofs of what happened there. They still had the crematorium, the “hospital” facility where God only knows how they were torturing people and the tiny areas where people slept. I do want to share with you couple of pictures because it’s right to know and to see what happened.

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I remember that day as a very grey day, it also rained at some point and I could feel the shivers while I was driving through the forest to get out of this place.
It’s painful but please go and visit one of the concentration camps around Europe if you have a chance, not only because it’s good to remember but also because you can teach your children what respect for the other human beings mean.
We cannot forget.

And to finish this post in the best way and to cheer you up why don’t you have a look at this TED Talk?
Matthieu Ricard, a Buddhist Monk, is talking about altruism.

Enjoy!

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